Governments must address need to restore public trust in tax, adviser says

Governments considering how multinationals should be taxed must address the erosion of public trust in tax administrations, while businesses continue to stress the importance of certainty in tax matters, panellists told a conference hosted by the Women in Tax network at Pinsent Masons’s London office November 20. Alexandra Readhead, an international tax and extractive industries consultant, said multinationals should be taxed “in a way that creates resources for public trust.”

Lizzie Arnold, a senior policy adviser at HM Treasury, outlined the UK government’s perspective on the taxation of multinationals. She described three aims, the first of which is to create a competitive corporate tax system … Giorgia Maffini, senior tax economist at the OECD, noted that residence and source are the two principles that define how multinationals are taxed. “We are trying to understand whether it’s time to think of another principle,” she said … Corporations are looking for “a bedrock of certainty” to provide stability, said Anna Elphick, vice president of tax for Asia and Africa at Unilever. Read more:

My news story for Tax Analysts, November 22 (paywall)

Tax specialists advocate cautious response to Paradise Papers

More could be done to tackle tax avoidance and evasion, but it is important not to tar all offshore activity with the same brush in the wake of the Paradise Papers, UK tax professionals suggested. One expert said simplification could reduce opportunities for those who seek to abuse the system.

As UK lawmakers and campaigners stepped up demands for greater transparency, Jonathan Riley, head of tax at Grant Thornton UK LLP, told Tax Analysts that the controversy “may represent the last chance for the tax profession to show it takes evidence of artificial tax avoidance seriously and will not promote it.” Riley noted that advisers are subject to many disclosure and compliance rules but tax is “still largely self-regulated.” It will be interesting to see whether the tax and accountancy bodies’ code on Professional Conduct in Relation to Taxation, updated with effect from March, is invoked in any cases featured in the Paradise Papers, he said. Read more:

My news story for Tax Analysts, November 17 ($)

UK lawmakers debate EU withdrawal bill

The UK government stressed its intention to preserve the UK’s constitutional integrity while avoiding the creation of a hard border with Ireland, as members of the House of Commons began detailed scrutiny of the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill.

James Brokenshire, secretary of state for Northern Ireland, has stressed that the government intends to “avoid any physical infrastructure” on the land border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. “We welcome the European Commission’s commitment to this as an important step forward,” he told members of Parliament on November 15.

My news story for Tax Analysts, November 16 ($)

UK government urged to implement public country-by-country reporting

The Paradise Papers revelations show that tax avoidance has become “a scourge on our society” and illustrate the need for public country-by-country reporting, Dame Margaret Hodge told members of the UK Parliament as she led an emergency debate November 14 while the government continued to defend its record of tackling avoidance and evasion.

Hodge, chair of an all-party parliamentary group on responsible tax, said the debate was urgent because Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond was putting the finishing touches on the budget statement, scheduled for November 22. “The actions and the culture of powerful, large corporations and of the wealthiest in our society, as revealed in the Paradise Papers, constitute a national and international disgrace,” Hodge said …

The Paradise Papers have exposed a crisis of confidence, Conservative MP Nigel Mills said. “We need our tax system to be fair and our financial system to be legally compliant and as clean as we can make it.” Read more:

My news story for Tax Analysts, November 15 ($)

House of Commons debate of November 14 on tax avoidance and evasion: transcript

US excise tax proposal invites retaliation, UK tax professionals say

A US excise tax on payments to related foreign corporations is a hostile measure that may violate bilateral tax treaties and prompt retaliation, UK tax professionals warned, as they presented their initial assessment of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

“It does seem to be a very interesting move by revenue authorities to build a kind of firewall within a jurisdiction, to say that you can only have a deduction to the extent that there’s a corresponding taxable amount in that jurisdiction,” said John Kilby, head of tax at Canary Wharf Group plc. “You could argue that it’s very clever of the [US] administration because it could force more jobs back to the US.”

Kilby was addressing participants at a November 6 conference on U.S. tax reform at the London office of Herbert Smith Freehills LLP. Sponsors included Tax Analysts and Sharp Partners P.A. Read more:

My news story for Tax Analysts, November 8 ($)

[Here’s an update from Jonathan Curry (free to view), published November 9.]

The September finance bill: an overview

While this week’s Paradise Papers revelations have rekindled the public debate and added pressure for further action to deter tax avoidance and evasion, for many businesses and tax advisers the immediate concern is keeping on top of changes already announced.

The second finance bill of 2017 has now completed its House of Commons stages, and will be considered ­– although it cannot be amended – by the House of Lords on 15 November, just a week before the chancellor is set to deliver his autumn budget. Consultation on several measures to be included in the next finance bill closed on 25 October …

My article for AAT Comment, November 7

HMRC will recruit up to 5,000 extra staff to prepare for Brexit

HM Revenue & Customs will recruit up to 5,000 additional staff in 2018, the UK government said less than a week after HMRC Chief Executive and Permanent Secretary Jon Thompson told a parliamentary committee that the department was planning to review its priorities in the light of uncertainty created by Brexit …

“Alongside the negotiations in Brussels, it is crucial that we are putting our own domestic preparations in place so that we are ready at the point that we leave the EU,” a spokesman for Prime Minister Theresa May said after [an October 31 cabinet meeting]. “Cabinet heard many of these will be needed even in our preferred scenario of a bold and ambitious deal — for example, implementing either of our proposed customs arrangements will require investment in new systems and customs officers by HMRC.” Read more:

My news story for Tax Analysts, November 1 ($)