Theresa May survives Conservative party confidence vote

Prime Minister Theresa May survived an attempted coup by Eurosceptic Conservatives, winning a vote of confidence in her leadership of the Conservative Party amid widespread frustration over the Brexit process.

Conservative members of Parliament voted 200-117 in May’s favour. The secret ballot on December 12 was triggered after Eurosceptic MPs secured the 48 signatures required for a vote. My news story for Tax Notes (paywall), December 13:

Theresa May Survives Conservative Party Confidence Vote

Scottish higher rate threshold frozen amid ‘tax gap’ concerns

The Scottish government’s tax policies will continue to focus on fairness and investment in public services, Derek Mackay, cabinet secretary for finance, economy and fair work, said as he delivered his budget.

But Mackay ignored the pleas of business groups who had expressed concerns over a “growing tax gap” between Scotland and the rest of the United Kingdom, according to Murdo Fraser, Conservative member of the Scottish Parliament and shadow finance secretary. My news story for Tax Notes (paywall), December 13:

Scottish Higher Rate Threshold Frozen Amid ‘Tax Gap’ Concerns

HMRC discretion is key to resolving loan charge dispute, MPs told

HM Revenue & Customs could use its “care and management” powers to reach a compromise with taxpayers facing the 2019 loan charge and avoid resorting to bankruptcy proceedings, a tax expert told members of Parliament.

“My personal viewpoint is that HMRC does have discretion to enter into a settlement arrangement with these individuals,” Chartered Institute of Taxation President Ray McCann told the House of Commons Treasury Subcommittee on December 10, in response to questions about the retroactive charge. My news story for Tax Notes (paywall), December 11, also published in the December 17 edition of Tax Notes International:

HMRC Discretion Is Key to Resolving Loan Charge Dispute, MPs Told

Tinkering with tax reliefs undermines stability, CIOT says

The Chartered Institute of Taxation has warned that “tinkering constantly with rates and allowances in unexpected ways” undermines stability and certainty and reduces international competitiveness. Several changes to tax allowances for businesses are “quietly working their way through Parliament” in the finance bill, the CIOT noted. Taxpayers do not welcome surprise changes and find them disruptive, it said.

My news story for Tax Notes (paywall), December 8: https://www.taxnotes.com/worldwide-tax-daily/tax-policy/tinkering-uk-tax-reliefs-undermines-stability-ciot-says/2018/12/10/28nvq