Tag: tax debate

Peers call for review of ‘disproportionate’ HMRC powers

A House of Lords committee called for a review of the powers available to HM Revenue & Customs, arguing that some powers granted since 2012 are disproportionate and lack effective safeguards for taxpayers.

“HMRC is right to tackle tax evasion and aggressive tax avoidance. However, a careful balance must be struck between clamping down and treating taxpayers fairly. Our evidence has convinced us that this balance has tipped too far in favour of HMRC and against the fundamental protections every taxpayer should expect,” said Lord Forsyth, chair of the House of Lords Economic Affairs Committee.

My news story for Tax Notes (paywall), December 4: https://www.taxnotes.com/worldwide-tax-daily/tax-policy/peers-call-review-disproportionate-hmrc-powers/2018/12/04/28n75

This story was also published in the December 10 edition of Tax Notes International.

Tax is really complex, but where is the law?

The Scottish budget has heaped more complexity on an already complex income tax system. There are to be two new rates for taxpayers on low and middle incomes.

Already, a UK taxpayer may have income that is charged at default rates, savings rates and Scottish rates. These rates include:

the default basic rate, the default higher rate, the default additional rate, the savings basic rate, the savings higher rate, the savings additional rate, the starting rate for savings, the savings nil rate, the dividend nil rate, the dividend ordinary rate, the dividend upper rate, and the dividend additional rate …

That list is drawn from a quick look at sections 6 to 16 of the Income Tax Act 2007, as revised, published in Tolley’s Yellow Tax Handbook. (Other handbooks are available.) Continue reading “Tax is really complex, but where is the law?”

UK government defends finance bill process amid concerns over scrutiny

Members of Parliament will have time to fully scrutinise the UK finance bill’s measures, Financial Secretary to the Treasury Mel Stride insisted after opposition MPs claimed that the government is seeking to avoid “proper scrutiny and transparency.”

Stride rejected opposition claims that the government is restricting the scope for amendments as MPs debated the bill at its second reading on December 11. Scottish National Party MP Kirsty Blackman asked why the government did not present an “amendment of the law” resolution for debate after the autumn budget on November 22.

My news story for Tax Analysts, December 14 (paywall)