Tag: tax policy

A personal tax roadmap would help address complexity, says OTS

Misunderstandings remain about UK taxation of savings income, but a personal tax roadmap would help address its significant complexities, the Office of Tax Simplification said last month.

A range of tax reliefs to encourage saving works well for most taxpayers, and 95 percent of people pay no tax on savings income, the OTS said. But the interaction between rates and allowances is so complex that HMRC’s self-assessment computer software has sometimes “failed to get it right,” the OTS pointed out in a 50-page report titled Savings Income: Routes to Simplification.

My news story of May 29 for Tax Notes (paywall) is now reproduced in full with permission: U.K. Office of Tax Simplification Calls for Personal Tax Roadmap (pdf).

Tax is really complex, but where is the law?

The Scottish budget has heaped more complexity on an already complex income tax system. There are to be two new rates for taxpayers on low and middle incomes.

Already, a UK taxpayer may have income that is charged at default rates, savings rates and Scottish rates. These rates include:

the default basic rate, the default higher rate, the default additional rate, the savings basic rate, the savings higher rate, the savings additional rate, the starting rate for savings, the savings nil rate, the dividend nil rate, the dividend ordinary rate, the dividend upper rate, and the dividend additional rate …

That list is drawn from a quick look at sections 6 to 16 of the Income Tax Act 2007, as revised, published in Tolley’s Yellow Tax Handbook. (Other handbooks are available.) Continue reading “Tax is really complex, but where is the law?”

Scottish tax plans create additional complexity and anomalies, experts warn

Planned changes to Scottish rates of income tax would add further complexity to a system that is already difficult for taxpayers to understand, tax professionals said after Derek Mackay, cabinet secretary for finance and the constitution, set out Scotland’s draft budget on December 14.

“Complexity is the price Scots will pay for exercising devolved powers over income tax. Today’s announcement underlines the increasingly diverging nature of income tax between Scotland and the rest of the UK,” said Moira Kelly, chair of the Chartered Institute of Taxation’s Scottish Technical Committee. The proposals have the potential to “increase both the costs and complexity of administering Scottish income tax as well as throwing into the mix some interesting anomalies,” she said.

The changes would establish Scotland as “a country with a very distinct tax system from the rest of the UK,” said Lindsay Hayward, head of tax for PwC in Scotland.

My news story for Tax Analysts, December 15 (paywall)

‘Sufficient progress’ claimed in Brexit talks while businesses call for clarity

The European Commission is satisfied that “sufficient progress has been achieved” on three priority issues in phase 1 of the Brexit talks, the commission announced on December 8, while questions remained about the implications of commitments given regarding Northern Ireland.

It is now for the European Council to decide at a December 15 meeting whether the negotiations should proceed to their second phase, the commission said, adding that its assessment, set out in a communication to the European Council (Article 50), was based on a joint report agreed by negotiators and endorsed by UK Prime Minister Theresa May and Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker.

My news story for Tax Analysts, December 8 (paywall)